Welcome Columbia Notes!

hello and a very happy Labour Day! We’re looking forward to our Coin, Stamps & Collectables show on Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th September. It’s at the Nikkei Centre in Burnaby – do come along. We’re delighted to welcome Ron Richardson and his wife, Doris, and Columbia Notes – specializing in the paper money of Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia, as well as world polymer issues. See their website here www.columbia-notes.com This 10,000 pesos note from Colombia was issued in 1992 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the landing in the New World by Christopher Columbus. The front depicts a woman from the Embera…

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Khmer Rouge currency – First IBNS Chapter meeting for 2016

Cambodia 1 riel 1975 Polpot Khmer Rouge bank note Hello,  A reminder that our first Chapter meeting for 2016 will be held on Wednesday, 10th February 2016 at the Burnaby Public Library on Willingdon Avenue. Program: ‘Cambodia : Year Zero – Khmer Rouge regime currency (1975 – 1979)’ – to be presented by long-time Chapter member and frequent program presenter, Dan Bellan. Don’t forget to bring along items for discussion – notes from your collection, new catalogues & books, etc. Doors open at 6:30pm and the meeting will commence at 7:00pm. Hope to see you there! Regards, Clint O’Toole Secretary…

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United States Banknotes for Hawaii

US $5 Hawaii

In early 1942, the United States government began issuing a special set of banknotes custom-made for Hawaii. The back of each note looked identical to the existing U.S. paper currency apart from one major difference: the word “HAWAII” was stamped across it. The design of these notes wasn’t the most elegant—the “HAWAII” looked as though it was inscribed by someone with a black ballpoint pen and a ruler. But that’s understandable, given their circumstances: these banknotes were an emergency series, rushed to print in the months following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The idea was that if Japan invaded Hawaii, the U.S. government could immediately…

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New Caledonia Emergency Postage Stamp Money

New_Caledonia-25_Centimes_(1914-23)

       Here are two examples of unusual paper money from New Caledonia. Between 1914 and 1923, New Caledonia postage stamps were used to make emergency issue currency. The first issues were pieces of cardboard to which stamps were affixed in denominations of 25 and 50 centimes, 1 and 2 francs, with the 50 centime denominations made from either a single 50 centime stamp or a 15 and a 35 centime stamp.  The reverse of the cardboard is handstamped with “TRESORIER PAYEUR DE LA NOUVELLE CALEDONIE”, roughly translated as: “PAYABLE BY THE TREASURER OF NEW CALEDONIA”.  This item is listed…

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Imperial Bank of Canada Counterfeit 1917 $100

Imperial Bank of Canada - Counterfeit

During the First World War, the Germans counterfeited the Imperial Bank of Canada’s $100 banknote presumably to undermine Canada’s financial system.  According to Joseph Boling’s March 12, 2012 presentation to the Chicago Coin Club entitled Official Counterfeiting of Paper Currency, “The counterfeit $100 Imperial Bank of Canada circulated in the Middle East, and became known in Canada in the 1920s. The paper does not feel right on this intaglio item of middle quality — the intaglio is shallow, and all pieces seen in the numismatic market have a Persian bank stamp (the Imperial Bank of Resht in northwest Iran, on…

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Operation Bernhard Bank of England 10 Pounds

Operation Bernhard Bank of England 10 Pounds

During World War II, Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp was the location of a secret plot called Operation Bernhard.  Its purpose was to undermine the British economy by issuing counterfeit Bank of England 5, 10 and 20 and 50 pound notes.  The plan was directed by and named after SS Major Bernhard Kruger. Major Kruger recruited 142 counterfeiters from among the inmates.  They were involved in engraving the complex printing plates, developing the appropriate rag-based paper with the correct watermark, and breaking the codes to generate valid serial numbers.   German agents abroad were putting these fake notes into circulation and by the…

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1820s Hudson’s Bay Company first promissory notes

HBC 1820 York Factory Pound 001

A One Pound Sterling and a Five Shilling promissory note from the Hudson’s Bay Company York Factory at the Red River Settlement. “Currency was needed by the new settlers in the Red River Settlement, and the Hudson’s Bay Company’s first promissory notes—2000 for one pound each and 4000 for five shillings each—were sent to York Factory in May 1820. The promissory notes were issued in books containing 100 notes each. They were not put into circulation immediately as Governor Simpson feared the settlers might hoard them, but after 1824 they gradually came into circulation and other denominations added. The notes…

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Hong Kong 1941 $1 Overprint

Hong Kong 1941 $1 Overprint

When the Japanese Army attacked Hong Kong on 8 December 1941 and overwhelmed the defenders on the mainland, the remaining British forces retreated to Hong Kong Island.   While under siege on Hong Kong Island there emerged a shortage of coins and $1 banknotes.  The shortage of the $1 banknotes arose when the Japanese distributed leaflets warning that all notes over $10 would be worthless after the Japanese took over the colony.   To relieve the situation, a stock of The Bank of China 5 Yuan notes were discovered on the premises of The Commercial Press Limited located on King…

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Bank Note: History of the Coffee Exportation in Costa Rica 1890

This 5 colones note was in circulation from 1968 to 1992 in Costa Rica. It was placed on sale at the Expo 86 Costa Rica pavilion and the envelope and note sold for 2 dollars. The note is dated 16(?)-10-1985. So it really must have circulated just after it was issued. It shows an allegorical painting in the National Theatre by a “J. Villa” (as credited on the banknote) in 1897 which is in the National Theatre. The Wikipedia website states that the painting was done by a Milanese artist named Aleardo Villa (1865-1906). Perhaps his first name is spelt…

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Eastern Townships Bank, Keremeos, B.C., cheque

Keremeos 827

Not knowing some banking history I thought it very unusual to see a “Eastern Township Bank” cheque from Keremeos, BC. I thought Eastern Townships usually relates to a group of towns back east and that it would be unusual for such a group to have branches out in British Columbia. I did know, however, that the Bank of Hamilton (Ontario) had at least one branch out here, so… For those mainland Vancouver types who do not go much into the interior, Keremeos is a village (which is sort of again another reason for wondering why an Eastern Townships bank office?)…

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Scrip: British POW Camps in India 1941

India Coin News notes > The British established POW camps in India in 1941 as a result of the large number of POWs captured during the North Africa campaign. Over 100,000 POWs were transfered to camps in India which held Italian and Japanese POWs and German, Japanese, and Italian civilian internees. Some Indian political prisoners were also held in the camps. Ten of the camps were known to have issued currency. There were two major types of notes issued. Type one notes have a 6 mm bar on the left side of the note and type two notes do not. A…

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Bank Notes: The world’s oldest (surviving) bank note ?

“In 1923, Dr. Richard Ehrenfeld of Vienna wrote to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to announce that he had in his possession the oldest bank note in existence, a one kwan (or guan) issue of the Ming dynasty from about the year 1375, discovered in 1888 during the demolition of an old house in Beijing and acquired by his father….” Read on in this interesting article on the American Numismatic Society’s blog  http://www.anspocketchange.org/the-worlds-oldest-surviving-paper-money/ “The Chinese not only invented paper, they invented paper money, during the reign of emperor Chen Tsung (998-1022 AD). Examples predating the Ming notes are rarely encountered and…

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