Founding of the Republic of China

60th Anniversary. Medal

              This article is credited to Michael Wilson of the North Shore Numismatic Society. This silver medal was struck by Taiwan on National Day, October 10, 1971, to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of China. It features a portrait of, then president Chiang Kai-shek on the obverse, along with the inscription “The 60th Anniversary of the Founding of the Republic of China” The reverse features two joined Chinese characters for the number “10”  (++) symbolizing the tenth day of the tenth month of 1911, the day of the Wuchang…

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China 2016 silver Panda – now a metric ounce

CHINA 10 YUAN 2016 SILVER PANDA,

China continued their popular silver Panda series with this attractive 2016 issue.  Each year features a different design featuring a cute giant Panda.  The 2016 issue depicts a Panda grasping a large tree branch.  The obverse features the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, a Taoist temple complex constructed in the early 1400’s. In keeping with what seems like a Chinese tradition of cutting corners, the 2016 Panda weighs 30 grams (.9645 oz) rather than 1 troy ounce (31.1035 grams).  The reasoning is that this will put the coin on the metric standard.  The coin is struck in .999 fine silver,…

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Happy New Year!

Canada 150 Dollars The Year Of The Monkey

The Chinese New Year is on February 8th 2016.  It’s the year of the Monkey! Most of the reverse images of monkeys I’ve seen so far have been ‘realistic’ in style and fairly poor works of design. But here’s a stylized monkey from Canada that bypasses ‘realistic’ fur for swirls and short lines and looks distinctly mischievous with the fruit of plenty in hand. Mintage 2500 Composition 18-karat gold Finish proof Weight (g) 11.84 Diameter (mm) 28 Edge serrated Certificate serialized Face value 150 dollars Artist Aries Cheung (reverse), Susanna Blunt (obverse) Thank you RCM for image and specification See more at…

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China Tea Brick Money

China Tea Brick Money

  The use of tea as a commercial trade item probably began with the heavy demand for fine Chinese tea from the Russian nobility. It was considered very valuable and only the rich could afford it. At first, dried leaves were transported from China to Russia by caravans of camels over the silk route.  In time it was discovered that a more convenient commodity could be fashioned by processing the tea and forming it into solid bricks about the size of a large book.  Eventually tea bricks became an accepted medium of exchange that could pass the same as silver…

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China celebrates 70th Anniversary of Victory in the war with Japan 1937 to 1945

70th Anniversary of the "victory in the War of Resistance against Japanese Aggression and the fight against fascism".

The People’s Republic of China has issued a set of 2015 coins to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the “victory in the War of Resistance against Japanese Aggression and the fight against fascism”. Zuo Xiuhui, deputy director of the People’s Bank of China’s Currency, Gold and Silver Bureau, said at a news conference that the set consists of one gold coin, two silver coins, and a nickel-coated steel coin. The gold coin, with a face value of 100 yuan, weighs a quarter of an ounce, while the five-ounce silver coin has a face value of 50 yuan and its one-ounce…

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10 Cash from Yunnan-Szechuan

Chinese coins are a whole new area for me. I’ve been having fun identifying a 10 Cash coin I won in  a (Vancouver) North Shore Numismatic Society auction. Mine is in VF condition with abrasion to the raised surfaces and a prominent scratch. The image below is a 1906 10 Cash from Yunnan-Szechuan in XF grade. with a value of $150. Y# 10w. I really like the stylized dragon!  A Tai Ch’ing Ti Kuo Dragon. This cash coin handily tells us english speakers that it is a Copper Coin. It’s Chi’ing dynasty or Manchu China. The Emperor is Kuang-hsü who decreed in 1905…

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Bank Notes: The world’s oldest (surviving) bank note ?

“In 1923, Dr. Richard Ehrenfeld of Vienna wrote to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to announce that he had in his possession the oldest bank note in existence, a one kwan (or guan) issue of the Ming dynasty from about the year 1375, discovered in 1888 during the demolition of an old house in Beijing and acquired by his father….” Read on in this interesting article on the American Numismatic Society’s blog  http://www.anspocketchange.org/the-worlds-oldest-surviving-paper-money/ “The Chinese not only invented paper, they invented paper money, during the reign of emperor Chen Tsung (998-1022 AD). Examples predating the Ming notes are rarely encountered and…

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