Stamps: Canada’s War Issue 1942 – 1943

Canada’s War Issue 1942 – 1943 On July 1 1942, a new series of definitive stamps was issued showing Canada’s contribution to the war effort of the Allied Nations. The Post Office Department issued stamps portraying King George as head of the Armed Forces in naval, military and air force uniforms. Subjects depicting Canada’s munitions, war supplies, shipbuilding, agriculture, her importance as a great air-training centre, and as a source of food were chosen for the pictorial stamps. The low value definitives with George VI in military uniforms were in use until 1949, while the War Issue pictorials were replaced by…

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Token Talk: The Vancouver Antique Flea Market

The Vancouver Antique Flea Market at 24 Water Street on the ground level of the Grand Hotel also issued an “admits two” tokens along with this wood in 1969 and an “admits two” token in 1970. I do recollect going down there once and seeing a vertical pile of these woods and they were very dirty. Knowing that tokens and woods were numismatic I started to try and get one but was discouraged by other members of my family who were there too (and saw nothing that they wanted). I am not sure how the tokens were distributed but it…

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UBC SUB Pizza Parlour

There was a time when the UBC Stamp and Coin Club could have met at night at SUB and had Pizza and Beer!!! Quite cheaply but then as you may see wages were not that great either then. A fairly replete history of the SUB Pizza Parlor from the Ubyssey (and its token) September 14th, 1976 Ubyssey “Parlor opens tonight Pizza and beer will replace hamburgers and milk every night in the SUB cafeteria snack bar beginning today at 7p.m. The new SUB pizza parlor will offer beer, wine, cider and pop over the counter from 7p.m. to 12:30a.m. Friday and…

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Canada’s Rarest Coin

Canadian Coin News > On 19th October 1911 “the Royal Mint of London, England sent dies for a new Canadian $1 silver coin to its Ottawa Branch; this coin is known today by collectors as the rarest coin from Canada. According to articles from the present day Royal Canadian Mint, when the Mint began striking coins in 1908 (then known as the Ottawa Branch of the Royal Mint), a one-dollar coin had not yet entered circulation, but was desperately needed; so in 1911, the Mint struck a trial one dollar coin in lead, while London’s Royal Mint struck two trial…

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Bank Notes: The world’s oldest (surviving) bank note ?

“In 1923, Dr. Richard Ehrenfeld of Vienna wrote to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to announce that he had in his possession the oldest bank note in existence, a one kwan (or guan) issue of the Ming dynasty from about the year 1375, discovered in 1888 during the demolition of an old house in Beijing and acquired by his father….” Read on in this interesting article on the American Numismatic Society’s blog  http://www.anspocketchange.org/the-worlds-oldest-surviving-paper-money/ “The Chinese not only invented paper, they invented paper money, during the reign of emperor Chen Tsung (998-1022 AD). Examples predating the Ming notes are rarely encountered and…

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